The wealth of nature: Increasing national wealth and reducing risk by measuring and managing natural capital

Date: 29 November 2017

Human prosperity and wealth has increased dramatically over the last 200 years. There have been marked reductions in poverty and increases in access to food, water, energy and housing across the globe. Earth now supports over 7.5 billion people at an average per capita income of over US$10,000 annually (World Bank, 2010). The poverty trap predicted by Malthus, (1798), has thus far, been avoided. However, globally, there are many frailties. Scientific research shows that some natural capital is in a poor state, with strongly adverse trends. There is clear evidence of wide-spread ecosystem degradation and declining resilience in food and water systems. Societal risks arising from interruptions of supply chains, extreme weather, species losses and erosion of topsoil and reduced agricultural yields are being documented around the world. This report considers the linkages between natural capital and human prosperity.

Cameron Hepburn Alexander Teytelboym Kirk Hamilton Fran├žois Cohen Frank Sperling

Economics of Sustainability

Economics of Sustainability

The wealth of nature: Increasing national wealth and reducing risk by measuring and managing natural capital


Type: book

Hepburn, C., Cohen, F., Teytelboym, A., Sperling, F. and Hamilton, K. (2017) 'The wealth of nature: Increasing national wealth and reducing risk by measuring and managing natural capital'. Report prepared in partnership with The Green Economy Coalition.


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