Past Event

Joint OMS/INET Oxford Book Talk: "Thank you for being late: an optimist’s guide to thriving in the age of acceleration" with Thomas L. Friedman, The New York Times' Foreign Affairs Columnist

You can view resources from this event in the panel on the right hand column

Post Event Resources

If you missed this lecture watch the video here.

This book talk is a joint event between the Oxford Martin School and The Institute of New Economic Thinking at the Oxford Martin School

In this talk Thomas L. Friedman, The New York Times' Foreign Affairs Columnist, will talk about how the planet’s three largest forces - the advance of technology, globalisation and climate change are each driving the other – and how these accelerations are fundamentally reshaping the world.

Please register here if you are interested: http://www.oxfordmartin.ox.ac.uk/event/2384

About the speaker

Thomas L. Friedman

Thomas L. Friedman is an internationally renowned author, reporter, and, columnist - the recipient of three Pulitzer Prizes and the author of six bestselling books, among them From Beirut to Jerusalem and The World Is Flat. He became The New York Times' foreign-affairs columnist in 1995. Previously, he served as chief economic correspondent in the Washington bureau and before that he was the chief White House correspondent. In 2005, he was elected as a member of the Pulitzer Prize Board.

He joined The Times in 1981 and was appointed Beirut bureau chief in 1982. In 1984, he was transferred from Beirut to Jerusalem, where he served as Israel bureau chief until 1988. He was awarded the 1983 Pulitzer Prize for international reporting (from Lebanon) and the 1988 Pulitzer Prize for international reporting (from Israel).

Friedman's latest book, Thank You for Being Late: An Optimist's Guide to Thriving in the Age of Accelerations, was released in Nov 2016. His previous book, The World Is Flat 3.0: A Brief History of the Twenty-first Century won the inaugural Goldman Sachs/Financial Times Business Book of the Year award. In 2004, he was awarded the Overseas Press Club Award for lifetime achievement and the honorary title, Order of the British Empire (OBE), by Queen Elizabeth II.

His book, From Beirut to Jerusalem (1989), won the National Book Award for non-fiction in 1989 and The Lexus and the Olive Tree (2000) won the 2000 Overseas Press Club award for best nonfiction book on foreign policy and has been published in 27 languages. He also wrote Longitudes and Attitudes: The World in the Age of Terrorism (2002) and the text accompanying Micha Bar-Am's book, Israel: A Photobiography.

Friedman received a BA degree in Mediterranean studies from Brandeis University in 1975. In 1978 he received a Master of Philosophy degree in Modern Middle East studies from Oxford.

About the book

Book CoverWe all sense it - something big is going on. You feel it in your workplace. You feel it when you talk to your kids. You can’t miss it when you read the newspapers or watch the news. Our lives are being transformed in so many realms all at once - and it is dizzying. In Thank You for Being Late, a work unlike anything he has attemptedbefore, Thomas L. Friedman exposes the tectonic movements that are reshaping the world today and explains how to get the most out of them and cushion their worst impacts. You will never look at the world the same way again after you read this book: how you understand the news, the work you do, the education your kids need, the investments your employer has to make, and the moral and geopolitical choices our country has to navigate will all be refashioned by Friedman’s original analysis.

Thank You for Being Late is a work of contemporary history that serves as a field manual for how to write and think about this era of accelerations. It’s also an argument for “being late” - for pausing to appreciate this amazing historical epoch we’re passing through and to reflect on its possibilities and dangers. To amplify this point, Friedman revisits his Minnesota hometown in his moving concluding chapters; there, he explores how communities can create a “topsoil of trust” to anchor their increasingly diverse and digital populations. With his trademark vitality, wit, and optimism, Friedman shows that we can overcome the multiple stresses of an age of accelerations - if we slow down, if we dare to be late and use the time to reimagine work, politics, and community. Thank You for Being Late is Friedman’s most ambitious book - and an essential guide to the present and the future.

 

Details:

23 January 2017 17:30 - 19:30

Further Information


Location

The Sheldonian

Broad Street
Oxford, OX1 3AZ