Thumbnail for Intergenerational social mobility: a Europe wide picture

Intergenerational social mobility: a Europe wide picture

13 Jul 2016

Intergenerational social mobility refers to the relationship between the socio-economic position an individual occupies and the socio-economic position in which he or she was brought up. Over the past several years questions about the relationship between social class origin and social class destination have occupied public discussion to a degree not seen in decades. Researchers from The Institute for New Economic Thinking at the Oxford Martin School have written the latest blog post for the 3rd International European Socia...

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Thumbnail for Economists gather to examine the different components of national wealth

Economists gather to examine the different components of national wealth

01 Jul 2016

A group of distinguished economists from universities, national governments, UN agencies and the private sector gathered at Waddesdon Manor in Buckinghamshire from 20-21 June 2016. Generously supported by Citi as well as the Rothschild Foundation, ‘The Wealth Conference’ was convened by Professor Cameron Hepburn of the Institute for New Economic Thinking at the Oxford Martin School and Professor Kirk Hamilton of the London School of Economics, in order to shine a spotlight on national wealth accounting, which goes be...

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Thumbnail for The Psychology of Voting to Leave the EU

The Psychology of Voting to Leave the EU

30 Jun 2016

People in Great Britain felt their leaders weren’t treating them fairly.  Politicians in the U.S. should take note. Eric Beinhocker, INET Oxford's Executive Director writing in the US journal The Atlantic. Britain’s Brexit vote has shocked the political elites of both the U.S. and Europe. The vote wasn’t just about the EU; in fact, polls before the referendum consistently showed that Europe wasn’t top on voters’ lists of concerns. But on both sides of the Atlantic Ocean, large ...

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INET Summer Research Meeting

24 Jun 2016

On 15th June INET Oxford researchers and Oxford colleagues gathered for our annual Summer Research Meeting and party.  Participants heard presentations on the centre’s latest research from faculty, postdocs, and students from across our research groups.  The topics included economic and social mobility, living standards, financial stress testing, wealth effects, forecasting the impacts of climate change, and many other subjects.  After the presentations and discussions participants gathered for a quick group ph...

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Thumbnail for Prof Robert Hahn Appointed to the Commission on Evidence-Based Policymaking

Prof Robert Hahn Appointed to the Commission on Evidence-Based Policymaking

09 Jun 2016

It has been announce that Prof Robert Hahn, Senior Research Fellow with INET Oxford and also Director of Economics and a Professor at the Smith School of Enterprise and the Environment at the University of Oxford, has been appointed Speaker on the Commission for Evidence-based Policymaking.  The Commission has been created to study how to integrate the large amount of data collected by the federal government and use it to perform evaluations that could help policymakers improve programs. B...

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Thumbnail for How did the UK economy do since joining the EU?

How did the UK economy do since joining the EU?

06 Jun 2016

In a letter to The Times INET Oxford researchers Professor Sir David Hendry, Professor Doyne Farmer, and Dr Max Roser look at how the UK economy has performed since joining the EU. Sir, Boris Johnson  recently asserted that the “EU is a graveyard of low growth”. This claim merits proper examination to determine, precisely, how the UK, US, Germany and France have done since 1973, the year in which the UK joined the EU. Per capita GDP of the UK economy grew by 103%, exceeding the 97% growth of the...

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Thumbnail for The refugee crisis — match us if you can

The refugee crisis — match us if you can

26 May 2016

Two Oxford academics, Will Jones of the Refugee Studies Centre and Alexander Teytelboym of the Institute for New Economic Thinking at the Oxford Martin School, are trying to persuade governments to use “matching  markets” in tackling the refugee crisis. Matching market are designed in order to resolve a variety of complex economic problems, such as the assignment of children to schools and living donor kidney exchange. Jones and Teytelboym think these tools could be used to assign refugees ...

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Thumbnail for Tony Atkinson wins Richard A. Lester Award

Tony Atkinson wins Richard A. Lester Award

24 May 2016

Princeton University has awarded INET Oxford's Tony Atkinson the prestigious Richard A. Lester Award for the Outstanding Book in Industrial Relations and Labor Economics Richard A. Lester's ties with Princeton and the Industrial Relations Section began in 1929, when he enrolled as a graduate student in economics. Lester served as an instructor at Princeton (1934-38), and returned as Associate Professor and Research Associate of the Industrial Relations Section in 1945. He served as Chairman of the Economics Departme...

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Thumbnail for Did Value at Risk cause the crisis it was meant to avert?

Did Value at Risk cause the crisis it was meant to avert?

12 May 2016

What were the causes of the crisis of 2008?  We show that managing risk using the procedure recommended by Basel II, which is called Value at Risk, may have played a central role.    We make a very simple model for the banking system that captures the key elements of risk management under Value at Risk.  Providing the banks’ only take modest risks, the financial system remains stable.  But if they take higher risks, or if the banking sector gets larger, the market begins to spontaneously osc...

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Thumbnail for Improving the Teaching of Econometrics

Improving the Teaching of Econometrics

05 May 2016

A new paper by David Hendry and Grayham Mizon discusses the need for a major shift in the Econometrics curriculum to include all the 'modern' topics essential to understanding and conducting empirical macroeconomic research. Even undergraduate econometrics courses must allow for time series which exhibit both evolution from stochastic trends and abrupt changes from location shifts, confronting the 'non-stationarity revolution'. The complexity and size of the resulting equations, which need to include the theory...

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Thumbnail for Climate economic models are broke, but there might be a way to fix 'em

Climate economic models are broke, but there might be a way to fix 'em

03 May 2016

Are the models underpinning global efforts to tackle climate change fit for purpose? Alex Teytelboym and Penny Mealy of the Institute for New Economic Thinking at the Oxford Martin School look at why a different approach should be tried. The economics of climate change - “the greatest market failure that the world has ever seen” – is one of the most difficult intellectual challenges facing economists today. As Nicholas Stern observed, climate economics must “be global, deal w...

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Thumbnail for Can we fix it? Solving Britain’s housing crisis

Can we fix it? Solving Britain’s housing crisis

29 Apr 2016

Britain’s housing crisis has been decades in the making, and is finally rising up the political agenda. But is this crisis really just confined to London and the South East, or is it spreading across Britain and other European countries? Which groups are on the receiving end of a lack of affordable housing? And how are living standards likely to be affected in the future if housing costs continue to rise? At an event at its headquarters in St James Park, the Resolution Foundation presented findings from its first ever h...

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